I Do Windows

Send me your questions!!!!!

Posted in Learn from the Pros by Arcadia on May 7, 2012

This coming Saturday we will have two guest speakers from the world of visual merchandising:

Ken Ferraris (Visual Manager from Barney’s NY).  Ken has been a wonderful contributor to our class in the past and I’m so happy he continues to support our program.

Terry Gut (Visual Merchandiser from Macy’s).  This will be Terry’s first time joining us.

They will be sharing their expertise on what it takes to make it in this business.  I have questions to ask them.  I’ve told my students to bring their questions, and dear readers if YOU have any questions please send them to me and I will be sure to ask the panel.

Three questions I get asked daily are:

  • How do you break into this industry?
  •  Is a portfolio of work necessary at an interview?
  • Is previous experience necessary?

Trust me, I will be sure to present these questions to our speakers!  Let me know if you have any others.  I will try to pick the ones that I think have the broadest appeal or get asked the most.

Students don’t be late, our panel begins at 10:30 am on Saturday.

See you then!

Findings from around the web: Man 1924, Christian Louboutin, C. Wonder

Posted in Discuss This Display, Fashion Styling, Mannequins, Nonpareil Windows by Arcadia on November 6, 2011

Here are some interesting things I found while perusing the web:

These first photos are from the store Man 1924 in Madrid, the photos are taken by  Scott Schuman of The Satorialist.  I think the store owner does a great job of layering the clothes with different textures and fabrics.  I especially like how they display the pants, much simpler than pulling them on the bust-form.  Dressing bust-forms is far more difficult than mannequins, because you have to create the shape and volume so the clothes don’t lay flat.

 

 

Here’s a cool video recently released by Barney’s, it gives you a quick behind the scenes peek on how the Christian Louboutin window’s were created.

Christian Louboutin: Celebrating 20 Years and the Launch of the Book from BARNEY’S NY/ Michelle Chu on Vimeo.

 

 

Have you heard or seen the new store C. Wonder?  Entrepreneur Chris Burch, and force behind the Tory Burch brand, has branched out and opened his own lifestyle store!  C. Wonder takes store ambience to a new level.  Each sales associate comes equipped with a iPad for purchases, and you can change the music and lighting in your dressing room!

Here are two types of visuals used to help solidify and brand the image, a cool bus and a beautiful wall mural:

The use of bold and bright colors makes this store look like a really fun place to shop!

The cashwrap does not look like your traditional register area – love it!

I have to admit it looks like Tory Burch meets Kate Spade.  Do you agree?

Great merchandising, this it what your dream closet would look like!

Lots of WOW factor without being too over the top and in your face!  Notice that the store design is simple with a few architectural touches here and there; what is drawing your eye in is the use of color everywhere!

The light fixtures are teapots!

(images via: smallshopstudio.com)

What are you finding around the web?

A Student’s Critique of Store Windows

Posted in Discuss This Display, Mall Field Trip Assignment by Arcadia on April 28, 2011

I’ve been wanting to post this assignment for the longest time, my student is beginning to wonder when am I going to give her paper back!  We were having technical difficulties with the corresponding photos.

Westfield Mall/Union Square Assignment by Syeda L.

Click here for the list of questions the students had to answer.

1.  The window that I found to be the most effective was Barney’s window.  This window was the most effective because it made me stop and pay attention.  I like how all of the garments displayed were in white and that there were these great quotes from the designers placed on the window and pictures of past collections scattered on the floor.

2.  The window that I found to be the least effective was Juicy Couture’s windows.  This window was the least effective because considering that they are right on Market Street, there is absolutely nothing eye-catching about their windows.  Their windows look like they were ill-planned and that there was absolutely no thought put into them.

3.  Barney’s had really cool and creative wall fixtures.  They used wall mounted face out fixtures for their display of Alexander Wang.

4.  Express used color blocking for their men’s collared shirts, as well as horizontal merchandising and product merchandising.  They arranged all of their shirts according to the color wheel; they were all folded horizontally in a wall, and they were all grouped together.

Bath and Body also had examples of product merchandising by grouping a whole bunch of bath soap of the same scent all together and displaying them on a table.

Another good display of horizontal merchandising is Anthropologie.  Anthropologie grouped some dresses all together and some jackets all together and some skirts all together on a wall.

5.  Bloomingdales used vendor displays for their Burberry area.  The vendor displays are all a light wood color mixed with steel that is specific to the mini Burberry shop.

6.  H&M uses POP displays.  Their POP displays are in front of each cash register and are in glass type containers and they contain small items like hair items or jewelry.

7.  The Icing uses a trend area.  The trend area is for St. Patrick’s Day.  It is a small circular wooden rack that has jewelry and other accessories related to St. Patrick’s Day.

8.  Diesel uses printed graphics in their windows.  They have a graphic of a man wearing Diesel merchandise and there are bikes scattered on the floor.

9.  Abercrombie and Fitch creates ambience with both music and scent.  When you walk into any Abercrombie and Fitch store, you are hit immediately with their overwhelming scent and the lighting is super dark and the music is super loud.  It feels like you stepped into a rave or something.

10.  Barney’s is my absolutely favorite store visually.  I love the creativity put into their visuals.  They have a really nice store design, good lighting, clear signage, quirky music for ambience, and really nice fixtures for the merchandise.

(all images via Syeda L.)

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